Cooking with infra-red energy, a real performance innovation

Please follow and like us:
Pinterest
Pinterest
Google+
https://welovefireplacesandgrills.com/grills/cooking-infra-red-energy-real-performance-innovation/
Houzz
Follow by Email
RSS

Just as you’re constantly changing, barbecues are changing too! To meet the increasing expectations of today’s chefs, products on the market offer increasingly innovative technological features. Amongst these, infrared burners have some real advantages, including a shorter cooking time. Here’s a brief overview of this feature with a variety of different uses.

How infrared works

Infrared has a similar effect on barbecues as the sun does on the earth, providing a radiant heat that cooks food directly rather than increasing the surrounding air temperature. This powerful heat is created by burners with thousands of individuals, equally-spaced perforations. These are ceramic and retain the energy from the flame while producing radiation to raise temperatures up to 1800 ° F (over 980 ° C).

A great boost

Unlike traditional burners that can cause food to dry out, the intensity of infrared heat surrounds food, helping to retain its juices and flavor. It also cooks directly and at a higher temperature, cutting the cooking time in half.

Those who love to save time will love this product, since infrared saves time and money while also helping the environment! In addition to a reduced cooking time, your barbecue heats up almost instantly and, thanks to this effective technology, uses less fuel, thereby reducing your costs and your carbon footprint at the same time.

Some useful information

  • Infrared is versatile but it’s particularly good for steaks.
  • If you want to cook your meat or other food for longer, after searing, reduce the temperature or move the meat to the side over the tubular burners. This will depend on your preferences and the model of your grill.
  • Do you want to know when your steak is ready? Then follow this special advice handed down by Napoleon. The texture of rare meat should look like the fleshy part of your left thumb when touching it with a finger on your other hand and pressing lightly on the tip of the same thumb with your left index finger. A medium to well-cooked steak should look like the tip of your left thumb when you press it with your middle finger on the same hand. If you like your steak well-done, use the ring finger on your left hand.

No Comments Yet.

Leave a comment

Pinterest
Pinterest
Google+
https://welovefireplacesandgrills.com/grills/cooking-infra-red-energy-real-performance-innovation
Houzz
Follow by Email
RSS